Published On: Thu, Feb 15th, 2018

AROUND THE REZ: Fariello’s “Images of America: Cherokee” is visually-stimulating

 

By SCOTT MCKIE B.P.

ONE FEATHER STAFF

 

Each week, the One Feather posts several “throwback Thursday” photos on our social media outlets.  A new book by Anna Fariello, has tons of photos featuring the Qualla Boundary (aka Cherokee Indian Reservation), and is basically a #throwbackthursday post that you can carry around with you.

Fariello, author and art curator, has released “Images of America: Cherokee” which is a 128-page book full of vintage photos showing the town of Cherokee as well as Eastern Cherokee people.

The book itself is divided into seven chapters of photos with descriptions including: home place, family life, work and school, community traditions, work by hand, keepers of culture, and destinations.

She writes in the introduction, “Cherokee is a bustling place, a place of destinations, tourism, cultural sites, shops, and even broadband.  The town takes its name from the people who have inhabited this land for as long as anyone can remember: the Cherokee people.”

PHOTOS: Anna Fariello, author and art curator, has released “Images of America: Cherokee” which is a 128-page book full of vintage photos showing the town of Cherokee as well as Eastern Cherokee people.

The chapter entitled “Home Place” features vintage maps and drawings interspersed with photos from the 1930s – 1950s showing some of the sites, buildings, and landscape of Cherokee.

“Family Life” shows vintage portraits of many Cherokee elders.  Families especially will enjoy this chapter I’m sure as they check out old photos of their relatives.

“Work and School” is pretty self-explanatory and “Community Traditions” has some wonderful photos of old stickball players, singers, dancers, and archers as well as some historical photos of the beginning of the outdoor drama “Unto These Hills”.

“Work by Hand” features the incredible arts and crafts tradition of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians including some of the legendary greats such as the late Goingback Chiltoskie and 19th century Cherokee potter Katalsta.

“Keepers of Culture” concentrates on cultural preservation organizations including the Museum of the Cherokee Indian and the Cherokee Historical Association.

The last chapter, “Destinations”, shows Cherokee as a tourist town and features photos, again from the 1930s and 1950s, including many Cherokee destinations that are no longer here.

The book, part of the Images of America series from Arcadia Publishing and The History Press, is a wonderful collection of old photos.

Fariello, the author of “Cherokee Basketry: From the Hands of Our Elders” and Cherokee Pottery: From the Hands of Our Elders”, was a 2013 recipient of the Guardians of Culture Award from the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums.

For more information or to purchase a book, visit: www.arcadiapublishing.com.

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