Events

Event listings are FREE of charge. Send your flyers/info to Scott at scotmckie@ebci-nsn.gov or to Cherokeeonefeather1966@gmail.com

BENEFITS/FUNDRAISERS

Golf Fundraiser Tournament. May 27 at 9 a.m. at the Sequoyah National Golf Course at 79 Cahon’s Mt. Rd. in Whittier, N.C. $125 for members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (per player), $150 for non-enrolled. Four-man teams, Best Ball, first 25 years. Proceeds will go to the Luftee River 16U boys basketball team traveling to Mesa, Ariz. for the Junior National Basketball Tournament June 21-23. Inf: Karina Squirrell (828) 736-4049

EBCI COMMUNITY EVENTS 

Museum of the Cherokee People Member Appreciation Night. May 23 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Museum in Cherokee, N.C. Enjoy behind-the-scenes tours, refreshments, and conversation at this exclusive after-hours event. If you’re not currently a member, you can join at https://motcp.org/support-motcp/. RSVP to Jeremy Hyatt, Museum development specialist, at Jeremy.hyatt@motcp by May 16. Info: Museum of the Cheroke People www.motcp.org

Didanisisgi Gadagwatli: A Showcase of Pottery from the Mud Dauber Community Workshop Opening Reception. May 24 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Museum of the Cherokee People in Cherokee, N.C. Enjoy the very first look at the Museum’s new exhibition featuring work by emerging Cherokee potters. Shop at a pop-up market. The workshop was led by Cherokee potter Tara McCoy. The exhibiting artists include: Mona Taylor, Faith Long-Presley, Steven Long, Chelsea Hemphill, Hope Long, Jake Stephens, Lori Sanders, Monique Taylor, Juanita Paz-Chalacha, Kaliya Wachacha, and Adelia Crowe. Info: Museum of the Cheroke People www.motcp.org

Cherokee Customer Appreciation Day. May 25 at the Cherokee Welcome Center in Cherokee, N.C. Info: (828) 359-6490

NAIWA Strawberry Festival. May 25 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Yellowhill Community Activity Center. Featuring strawberry pancakes and strawberry shortcake. Vendor tables are $10/each. To reserve a table(s) or for more information: Lucille Wolfe (828) 736-5285

Cherokee High School Class of 1974 Reunion planning meeting. May 29 at 11 a.m. at Qualla Java in Cherokee, N.C. Anyone is invited to help plan the reunion which is set for Saturday, Aug. 10 at 5 p.m.at the Tsali Manor outside picnic area.

Teach What Your Know, Share What You Have Annual Conference. May 30 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and May 31 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the New Kituwah Academy in Cherokee, N.C. Early Childhood Curriculum ANA Esther Martinez Project, sights and insights from the Hawaiian Immersion Program, the role of archiving and transcribing in language learning, Project Songbird Language Learning through music, theory in Second Language Acquisition, keynote speaker is Namaka Rawlins who is the past chair of the Native Hawaiian Education Council. This event is sponsored by the Kituwah Preservation and Education Program. Info: https://ebcikpep.com

Larch Family Reunion. May 30 at 4 p.m. at the Oconaluftee Island Park pavilion near the Open Air Market in Cherokee, N.C.

Annual Kituwah Celebration. May 31 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Kituwah Mound. This event celebrates the return of the Mother Town to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Stickball demonstration, music, social dances, and dinner. Info: https://ebcikpep.com

3rd Annual Animal Health Clinic. May 31 – June 1 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. both day at the Yellowhill Activity Center at 1416 Acquoni Road in Cherokee, N.C. Dog/cats spay: $50. Dog neuters: $30. Cat neuters: $25. Vaccines (rabies and distemper): $10 per pet. Horses – West Nile vaccine: $30, Float: $50. No appointment necessary. First-come, first-served. Info: Dr. Page Wages (919) 906-1280 or Pastor Scott Hill (828) 508-7836

Kolanvyi Day. June 1 at 10 a.m. at the Kolanvyi Stickball Field. Kids craft corner, face painting, door prizes. 50/50 raffle, silent auction, music, exhibition stickball games, ribbon skirt contest, and more. Info: Lisa Hardesty (828) 788-1646, Butch Hill 506-8936, or Venita Wolfe 554-1199

2024 Cherokee Recreation Summer Day Camp. June 3 – Aug. 2 (Monday through Friday 7:15 a.m. to 5 p.m.). Hosted by Cherokee Recreation, program includes: swimming, sports, outdoor activities, arts and crafts, language and cultural activities, and more. Fee: $400. Applications are currently being accepted at the Peaches Squirrell Sports & Recreation Complex. Info: (828) 359-6890 or 359-3345 or email Shannon Bark at shanbark@ebci-nsn.gov or Dinah Grant at dinagran@ebci-nsn.gov

Books on the Boundary: “The Berry Pickers”. June 26 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Museum of the Cherokee People in Cherokee, N.C. The Museum of the Cherokee People Reading Circle will meet in the Museum Store to discuss “The Berry Pickers” by Amanda Peters (Mi’kmaq). The Reading Circle is a quarterly book club that discusses the best fiction, nonfictions, and poetry written by Indigenous authors. Books are available for purchase in the Museum Store. Info: Museum of the Cheroke People www.motcp.org

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Pow Wow. July 5-7 at the old Cherokee High School site in Cherokee, N.C. Emcees: Rob Daugherty and Dennis Bowen. Arena Director: Darrell Goodwill. Head Dance Judge: Will Tushka. Head Northern Drum Judge: Osceola Redshirt. Head Southern Drum Judge: Perry Cheevers Toppah. Invited Northern Drums: Wild Rose, Little Bear Singers, Iron Swing, MGM. Invited Southern Drums: Cozad, Blazing Bear, Southern Slam, South Side. Over $150,000 in prizes. Must be a member of a federally recognized tribe or First Nations (Canada) People to contest. Info: Daniel Tramper (828) 399-0835, dtramper@gmail.com

4th of July Fireworks. July 6 at 1441 Acquoni Road (old Cherokee High School site) in Cherokee, N.C. Info: (828) 359-6490

The Way We Connect with the World event. Aug. 2 at Harrah’s Cherokee Casino Resort Events Center in Cherokee, N.C. Since 2022, Museum of the Cherokee People’s “The Way We” events have been an opportunity for the Museum to honor and highlight Native pop culture and showcase timely perspectives for Cherokee people, primarily by, Cherokee people. These community-centered events put Native self-representation in the spotlight and uplift the work that Native people are doing to explore identity through artistic expressions in film, music, visual art, and more. Info: Museum of the Cheroke People www.motcp.org

Talking Trees Children’s Trout Derby. Aug. 3-4 at the Oconaluftee Island Park in Cherokee, N.C. Info: (828) 359-6471

Confluence: An Indigenous Writers’ Workshop. Sept. 20-21 in the Museum of the Cherokee People Multipurpose Room. Created in partnership with Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and author of the award-winning novel “Even As We Breathe”, this series of workshops offers EBCI tribal members and members of other federally recognized tribes access to high-quality writing instruction from the world’s top Indigenous writers at no cost. Workshops are open to the public is space is available. Visiting writers and registration opening date is to be announced. Info: Museum of the Cheroke People www.motcp.org

Cherokee Indian Fair. Oct. 1-5 at 1441 Acquoni Road (old Cherokee High School site) in Cherokee, N.C. Info: (828) 788-1708

Cherokee Fall Rod Run. Oct. 11-12 at 1441 Acquoni Road (old Cherokee High School site) in Cherokee, N.C. Info: (828) 226-6853

Scareokee. Oct. 31 at 181 Tsali Blvd. (old Cherokee Elementary School site) in Cherokee, N.C. Info: (828) 359-6490

Cherokee Christmas Parade. Dec. 14 in downtown Cherokee, N.C. Info: (828) 359-6490

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETINGS

(All meetings are held in the Cherokee Tribal Council House in Cherokee, N.C. unless otherwise noted.)

Lands Committee. May 23 at 9 a.m.

 

 

HEALTH & SPORTS EVENTS

Memorial Day Fishing Tournament. May 25-26 in the general fishing waters of the Qualla Boundary. $10,000 in cash prizes. Registration deadline is Friday, May 24.Registration fee is $15. Paid fish permit fee covering both tournament days is $17. Fishing hours are one hour prior to sunrise until one hour after sunset. Tag turn-in time is 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. each respective tournament day. Turn in your tags at 517 Sequoyah Trail in Cherokee, N.C. (across from the Cherokee Welcome Center. Info: https://fishcherokee.com

2024 Cherokee Youth Football and Cheerleading registration. Early Bird registration of $25 is open now until June 5. Late registration of $50 is for June 6 – July 2. Football: July 1, first day of conditioning; July 15, first day with helmets; July 22, first day with full gear. Cheerleading: Practice days/times will be determined by the coaches, but it will not start earlier than July 1. Register at: https://registration.teamsnap.com/form/7226 Info: Peaches Squirrell Sports and Recreation Complex (828) 359-6890 or Kelsey Jackson at kelsjackson@ebci-nsn.gov

Third Annual Native American All-Star Baseball Showcase. June 7-9 at Truist Park in Atlanta, Ga. The Atlanta Braves will host this third annual event. The top high school baseball players of Native American descent from around North America will participate in a pro-style workout on Saturday, June 8 and a showcase game on Sunday, June 9. Native youth can register at https://www.mlb.com/braves/community/native-american-community/showcase.  Applications are open through May 30.

Tim Hill Memorial Fishing Tournament. July 13-14 in the general fishing waters of the Qualla Boundary. $10,000 in cash prizes. Registration deadline is Friday, July 12.Registration fee is $15. Paid fish permit fee covering both tournament days is $17. Fishing hours are one hour prior to sunrise until one hour after sunset. Tag turn-in time is 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. each respective tournament day. Turn in your tags at 517 Sequoyah Trail in Cherokee, N.C. (across from the Cherokee Welcome Center. Info: https://fishcherokee.com

Qualla Country Fishing Tournament. Aug. 24-25 in the general fishing waters of the Qualla Boundary. $20,000 in cash prizes. Registration deadline is Friday, Aug. 23. Registration fee is $15. Paid fish permit fee covering both tournament days is $17. Fishing hours are one hour prior to sunrise until one hour after sunset. Tag turn-in time is 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. each respective tournament day. Turn in your tags at 517 Sequoyah Trail in Cherokee, N.C. (across from the Cherokee Welcome Center. Info: https://fishcherokee.com

7 Clans Rodeo. Aug. 31-Sept. 1 at 181 Tsali Blvd. (old Cherokee Elementary School site) in Cherokee, N.C. Info: (828) 359-6471

 

SUPPORT GROUPS 

Autism Support Group meeting. June 4 at 5 p.m. at the Dora Reed Multipurpose Room in Cherokee, N.C. Join for autism support, education, and resources. Info: Candy Ross (828) 359-2203 or Amanda Bradley 359-2204

Alcoholics Anonymous meets every Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at Analenisgi. Info: www.AAwnc80.com

Celebrate Recovery meets every Friday at 6pm at 1 Hospital Rd, Cherokee, NC. Celebrate recovery is a Christ centered, recovery program for anyone struggling with hurt,hang-ups and habits of any kind. All are Welcome. Contact is Chris McMillan 828-788-5410.

Cherokee Cancer Support Group, potluck dinner with a speaker the first Thursday of each month at 5:30 p.m. at Betty’s Place, 40 Goose Creek Rd, Cherokee, N.C. Anyone is welcome to attend the potluck. The group provides educational and emotional support to clients and families of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians members with cancer. The group can provide financial assistance for fuel, lodging, and transportation and also can assist with mastectomy items, nutritional supplements, wigs, and related products. The group can volunteer to take a client to their appointment if it is requested in a timely manner. Betty’s Place is open Monday through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Info: (828) 497-0788

Life Recovery is a Bible-based 12-step small group meeting held Mondays from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. held in the Rivercane Conference Room at Analenisgi.  All material is provided. This small group is for anyone struggling in life with addiction, food, depression, anxiety, relationships, or spiritual struggles. Info: Deb Conseen-Bradley at kellideb@gmail.com or Scott Hill (828) 508-7836

MARA (Medication-Assisted Recovery Anonymous) meets Thursdays at 5 p.m. in the Rivercane Room at Analenisgi. Info: Analenisgi (828) 497-9163 or visit: https://cherokeehospital.org/locations/analenisgi

 

WESTERN N.C. & BEYOND EVENTS 

15th Annual Season of Concerts on the Creek. Every Friday night (starting May 24 through Labor Day) from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Bridge Park in Sylva, N.C. Everyone is encouraged to bring a chair or blanket. These events are free, but donations are encouraged. Dogs must be on a leash. No smoking, vaping, coolers, or tents are allowed. There will be food trucks on site for this event. These concerts are organized and produced by the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce, the Town of Sylva and the Jackson County Parks and Recreation Department. Info: Jackson County Chamber (828) 586-2155, visit https://www.mountainlovers.com/concerts-on-the-creek/ or Concerts on the Creek’s Facebook page.

Native American Arts Festival in the Smokies. May 25 at the Great Smoky Mountains Event Park at 1130 Hyatt Creek Road in Bryson City, N.C. Gates open at 9 a.m. Traditional dances at 10 a.m., grand entry at 12 p.m. Closing at 6 p.m. Native American arts and crafts, food, dances – traditional and pow wow. Info: infonativeartsncrafts@gmail.com

Indivisible Swain County meeting. May 27 at 7 p.m. via Zoom. The agenda focus is environmental issues facing Swain County. All are welcome to attend. Contact indivisibleswain@gmail.com for a Zoom link for the meeting or for questions

Venezuelan Cooking & Culture series. May 30 at 6 p.m. at the Jackson County Public Library in Syla, N.C. The program will be “Los Papas de Los Helados: A Legacy of Dictatorship” honoring the national dish of Venezuela, Pabellon Criollo (stewed beef with spices, sweet plantains, rice, and black beans), while acknowledging the history of authoritarian rule and its influence in the culture. Registration is required. Call (828) 586-2016 or email JCPL-Adults@fontanalib.org

Paranormal Investigation at Tipton-Haynes State Historic Site. May 31 and June 1 at the Tipton-Haynes State Historic Site at 2620 South Road Street in Johnson City, Tenn. The haunted and historic buildings of Tipton-Haynes State Historic Site will be opened to the public for two nights.  The S.R.S Paranormal team is back to guide the hunt as they use their investigative equipment and teach the public the methods of their profession. Each night will begin at 6 p.m. and end around 11 p.m. There will be a limit of 20 participants each night that must be 12 years or older. Tickets can be found on the S.R.S Paranormal Facebook page or by emailing tiptonhaynes@outlook.com. Cost is $35 per participant plus fees.

Swain County Genealogical and Historical Society meeting. June 6 at 6:30 p.m. at the Swain County Regional Business Education and Training Center at 45 East Ridge Drive in Bryson City, N.C. Jim King will present “Murphy Branch Memories: The TVA, Fontana Reservoir, and Southern Railway”. Conversation and refreshments will follow the presentation. Attendance is free of charge, but donations are appreciated.

Living Legacy Fall Trade Fair. Aug. 23-24 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. each day at the McMinn County Living Heritage Museum at 522 W. Madison Ave. in Athens, Tenn. Admission is free. Demonstrations of woodcarving, soap making, Appalachian music, hand quilting, herbal tinctures, felting, beadwork, pyrography, and more. Info: www.livingheritagemuseum.org

Gatlinburg Farmers Market. Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. through Oct. 19 at 1222 E. Parkway next to City Hall in Gatlinburg, Tenn., across from Food City. Free parking. Still accepting new vendors. Info: Glo (865) 640-7190, glotreecastle@gmail.com, or www.TheGatlinburgFarmersMarket.com